Facebook Vimeo Flickr Skype
Home » Mui Ne » Annual “Red tide” hits the Mui Ne beaches but what causes it?

Annual “Red tide” hits the Mui Ne beaches but what causes it?

It is a common occurrence up and down the coast in Vietnam but what exactly is “Red tide” and does it have an environmentally adverse effect on us or the Eco-system?

These algae, known as phytoplankton, are single-celled protists, plant-like organisms that can form dense, visible patches near the water’s surface. Certain species of phytoplankton, dinoflagellates, contain photosynthetic pigments that vary in color from green to brown to red.

When the algae are present in high concentrations, the water appears to be discolored or murky, varying in color from purple to almost pink, normally being red or green. Not all algal blooms are dense enough to cause water discoloration, and not all discolored waters associated with algal blooms are red. Additionally, red tides are not typically associated with tidal movement of water, hence the preference among scientists to use the term algal bloom.

Some red tides are associated with the production of natural toxins, depletion of dissolved oxygen or other harmful effects, and are generally described as harmful algal blooms. The most conspicuous effects of these kinds of red tides are the associated wildlife moralities of marine and coastal species of fish, birds, marine mammals, and other organisms.

5

 

But not all algal blooms are harmful. Most blooms, in fact, are beneficial because the tiny plants are food for animals in the ocean. In fact, they are the major source of energy that fuels the ocean food web. Although the ocean in Mui Ne at these times looks and smells awful, there is no health or environmental effect to the bloom but precautions should be taken not to ingest large amounts or enter the water with open cuts and scrapes.

A small percentage of algae, however, produce powerful toxins that can kill fish, shellfish, mammals, and birds, and may directly or indirectly cause illness in people. HABs also include blooms of non-toxic species that have harmful effects on marine ecosystems. For example, when masses of algae die and decompose, the decaying process can deplete oxygen in the water, causing the water to become so low in oxygen that animals either leave the area or die.

 

Similar posts

Loading Facebook Comments ...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Translate »